Do you work in infection prevention?

Then take a look at our site for infection prevention professionals!

Professionals Site

Infection prevention starts with you!

When you or a loved one goes into a healthcare facility when you’re sick, you expect to get better—right? But did you know that each year, approximately 1 in 25 people in the U.S. get infections in hospitals while being treated for something else?

Unfortunately, nearly 75,000 people in hospitals die each year with these infections—many of which could have been prevented with proper infection prevention practices.

Everyone plays a role in infection prevention—patients, families, and healthcare personnel. You play an important role in infection prevention—in and out of healthcare facilities.

First and foremost, know the basics of infection prevention. Do your part—and hand hygiene is key! Whether you’re in a healthcare facility or in the community, there are things you can do to stay safe from infections.

Consumer alerts

How to be a good (and healthy) roommate
9/1/2016
It’s that time of year again. School has started, and many young adults are heading off to college for the first time. There will be new adventures and experiences. Personal hygiene may not be a priority for everyone on your dorm floor, so we want to give you some tips on how to be a good roommate and how to stay healthy while you’re away at school.
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What you need to know about Zika virus
8/1/2016
Zika is a mosquito-borne virus that is currently causing a large outbreak primarily in Central and South America. In addition, the Florida Department of Health has identified an areas in Miami where Zika is being spread by mosquitoes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued guidance for people who live in or have traveled to Wynwood (any time after June 15) and Miami Beach (any time after July 14). See other areas where Zika has been found.
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Hepatitis
7/26/2016
Hepatitis is inflammation of the liver that may be caused by viruses, drugs, alcohol, or some hereditary or immune problems. The most common types of hepatitis are A, B, and C. In the United States, the most common type of viral hepatitis is hepatitis C.
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